Training: Texas provides a 35-hour Parent Resource Information Development Education (PRIDE) course providing instruction regarding basic child care, along with specific considerations that for each prospective adoptive parent. Prospective adoptive parents will also participate in three additional training and certification programs outside of the PRIDE program, each designed to further educate the adoptive parents regarding meeting the needs of their adoptive child.
From exploring your available options and addressing disputes or challenges that arise to ensuring your rights and interests are protected through finalization hearings, Coker, Robb & Cannon, Family Lawyers can provide the step-by-step guidance to make your adoption experience a success. This includes facilitating a formal termination of parental rights (voluntary or otherwise), compiling the necessary documentation and legal work, meeting requirements and preparing for various studies and reports, and ensuring the best interests of a child are met. Although circumstances may vary, the adoption process can take months to complete, which is why having the support of caring and compassionate attorneys experienced in these matters can make all the difference.
An adoption lawyer will be knowledgeable on state- and country-specific adoption laws and provide guidance based on your situation, whether it be a private adoption, a step parent adoption, or if you’re a same sex couple wanting to adopt. A lawyer can prepare you for any hearings that may be required in the adoption process. In addition, your adoption attorney can represent you in court if there are legal complications, such as the birth parents changing their minds or trying to extort you.
Each state makes its own laws in the area of adoption, according to state statute. While some federal laws do apply, practices and policies can vary widely from one state to another or even from one county to the next. To learn about laws specific to your state or jurisdiction, visit the website of the Child Welfare Information Gateway, at http://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/ or contact your county's Department of Children and Youth.
Under Texas law, a child may only have one set of legal parents. In a simple definition, an adoption is a type of legal proceeding in which a parent or parents who are interested in adoption, ask the court to deem them the legal parents of a child. When a potential parent or parents decide to adopt a child and bring them into their home, the process of adoption begins when the child meets legibility factors set forth under Chapter 162 Sections 162.001, 162.501, and 162.504 of the Texas Family Code. The eligibility factors of the child are paraphrased below:
The laws of the state in which the child was adopted determine who has access to the original birth certificate or other adoption records, and whether those records are sealed (unavailable). For information about the law in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia, see the: http://www.childwelfare.gov/adoption/. This links to the Child Welfare Information League’s numerous publications on the legal aspects of adoption.

Texas adoption laws allow almost any adult who is over the age of 18 to adopt a child, although in some cases the child may need to consent to the adoption. In addition to being over the age of 18, a person or family who is interested in adopting a child will need to demonstrate that they will be able to provide for the child and meet the child’s best interests. Under Texas Family law, a person is not required to be married in order to adopt a child. However, at times it can seem that adopting a child as a single parent is more complex, that is why you should consider working with an experienced Dallas adoption attorney before you file any paperwork with the court.
5. WHAT ARE THE COSTS OF THE ADOPTION? – You will want to know who helps guide you in appropriate adoption fees, what is legal and what is paid to whom and when. For the attorney specifically: How do they bill? Do they have a consultation fee, a retainer, a set rate or do they bill by the hour? You should have an estimated adoption budget before you begin the process, and know what part is for legal fees.

Texas adoption laws allow almost any adult who is over the age of 18 to adopt a child, although in some cases the child may need to consent to the adoption. In addition to being over the age of 18, a person or family who is interested in adopting a child will need to demonstrate that they will be able to provide for the child and meet the child’s best interests. Under Texas Family law, a person is not required to be married in order to adopt a child. However, at times it can seem that adopting a child as a single parent is more complex, that is why you should consider working with an experienced Dallas adoption attorney before you file any paperwork with the court.
An open adoption agreement spells out the terms of the contact between the parties in an open adoption. An open adoption agreement can specify frequency and manner of contact between adoptive and birth families, and/or between siblings placed separately. However, while it may be drawn up in the form of a contract and signed by both parties, it is not legally binding.
Each step you complete prior beginning the adoption process prepares you and your family to bring a new child into your home — and helps ensure a seamless integration with your family. These steps are basically the same for families who wish to open their homes to children in need of foster care. Your Dallas family law attorney at GoransonBain Ausley can help guide you through the adoption process.

Thank you for all your help. I do have one adopted child and that was private and we used a lawyer. I do know about trying to find the mother and I am in touch with the birth mothers father ( the child's grandfather) He told me she moves around alot and goes from state to state and friends to friends and that she never leaves an address or phone number. Since the father is unknown and the birth mother originally told me he died ( not sure if that's true) what will happen with that? My husband still wants to try and do this without a lawyer. We have all the papers from our local courthouse but just need to know the order in which to do them. I'm not sure we will be required to have a home study, my husband is reading up on the laws in PA a little each evening but this takes time and patience.
Choose an attorney with experience in private adoptions. When you interview attorneys, ask if they are a member of the American Academy of Adoption Attorneys or an equivalent state accreditation.[9] If your attorney is not accredited, question her about her specific experience handling private adoptions. The AAAA maintains a directory of accredited adoption attorneys in the United States.[10]

Because of the complexities of the adoption process and the potential for negative consequences, it is not recommended that you attempt to do an adoption pro se. Even a consent adoption within the family, for example, an aunt and uncle adopting a nephew with full consent of the birth parents, should still be prepared and shepherded through the court by an attorney.
Once all of these steps and reports are complete the court will evaluate all of the information provided in an effort to determine what is best for the child. The judge will make this decision after hearing the testimony of involved parties, examining the required reports and studies and then applying the law that applies to your particular situation.
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